Nazi Baby Machines: Hitler Institutes the Mother’s Cross 1938

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Yeah, that makes dropping crotch fruit for two decades totally worth it. Photo by germanculture.com.ua

On August 12, 1938, Adolph Hitler introduced the Mother’s Cross as an incentive for German women to produce butt-loads of children for the Third Reich. Hitler chose that date specifically to honor his mother Klara every year on her birthday. A gold medal was presented to mothers with seven children, a silver to mothers with six children, and a bronze to those losahs with a mere five.

Once young German women turned 18 and graduated from the Hitler Youth movement, they became eligible for an offshoot of the League of German Girls called Faith and Beauty. The purpose of this organization was to teach young girls how to be ideal Aryan mothers. Of course, one of the most critical components of being an ideal mom was popping a bunch of kids out in rapid succession.

It’s a uterus lady, not a clown car. Photo by Libertynation.com

The Nazis also promoted the creation of families and obedience to the state with the Law for the Promotion of Marriages, which was a smaller statute contained within the Law for the Reduction of Unemployment. Initially, this legislation sought to reduce male unemployment by shoo-ing women back home to their domestic duties, as it should be(pppfft). When that backfired and labor shortages resulted, it morphed into a loan program that rewarded young couples for marrying and having families.

According to the SS, if one was capable of carrying and giving birth to a child, it was considered unnatural not to do so for “selfish personal reasons.” According to the Nazi mindset, the very purpose of marriage was procreation, and birth control went completely against the laws of nature. Heinrich Himmler would often use Germany’s famous composers to illustrate the dangers of birth control:

“What would have happened if Mrs. Bach after her twelfth child had said enough is enough? What would have been the result if Mrs. Wagner only had five children?” (Maybe your mother should have stopped one child sooner, Herr Himmler. Just sayin.’)

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She’s a baby, baby machine watch her get down, watch her get down Photo by Gettysburg Museum of History.

The Nazis not only heavily restricted birth control; they also made access to abortion almost impossible. Himmler established the Central Agency for the Struggle Against Homosexuality and Abortion in 1936. Six years later, the death penalty loomed over women who had abortions in “extreme cases.” Birth control centers were closed by the police, and the government strictly controlled the advertising of contraceptive devices.

The only abortions allowed in Nazi Germany were ones involving “unhealthy” children, as defined by the notorious Law for the Prevention of Hereditary Diseased Offspring, and of course, Jewish children. In both cases, it was perfectly acceptable to abort, as it was in the “best interest” of the German people to do so.

How bone-chilling is that? Can we try not to repeat history, America?

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Trade ‘em! Collect ’em all! Photo by USM Books.com

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is a political junkie and history buff randomly alternating between bouts of crankiness and amusement while bearing witness to the Apocalypse. Come along!

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